Every effort has been made to make this site accessible to those who are blind, have a visual impairment, deaf, hard of hearing, and/or have a cognitive disability.  If you are having any issues with this site's accessibility or understanding the content of the site, please let us know by emailing lpilcher@sweetbehavior.com or by calling (812) 725-1665.  

All of these services are coming very soon. In the meantime, check out below for a preview! 

PAC Services

 

Participant Assistance and Care or “PAC” (rhymes with the word “back”) is a service that people can use to get assistance to go out in the community and to get help at home.  For example, if a person does not have their driver’s license, then someone from Sweet Behavior could come over and take them shopping.  If a person needs help keeping their apartment clean, then someone could also come over and help them with that.  PAC services aren’t just for chores.  They also can be used for fun things like going out to eat, going to a movie, or visiting with friends. PAC is only available on the Family Supports Waiver (FSW). 

Respite Services


Respite is a service where a person from Sweet Behavior comes to give a parent or a caregiver a break for a little while.  A staff member with Sweet Behavior can come over to the person’s house or the person can be dropped off at another location to receive respite care.  Respite care does not have to just be provided in a home, though.  Staff members can take clients out in the community, too! Whatever is best for the client and their loved ones. Respite services are available on both the Family Supports Waiver (FSW) and Community Integration Habilitation (CIH) Waiver. 

A question that often arises is: “What is the difference between PAC and respite services?” Besides the fact that PAC is only available on the Family Supports Waiver, the other big difference is the intent behind each service. Respite is designed to give a primary caregiver a break whereas PAC services are designed to focus on specific daily living skills goals and promote independence.  This doesn’t mean, though, that someone living with their relatives can’t benefit from PAC services! A person is never too young or too old to work on daily living skills.

Community Based Habilitation Services

 

Community habilitation is a service where people go into the community to work on their goals.  What do they do? Well, that depends on the goals that the person has.  For example, if a person has a goal to go shopping for groceries then someone at Sweet Behavior would take them to the store and help them do that.  Sometimes a small group will go out into the community and work on goals together.  For instance, if several people have a goal to work on exploring the community, they might all go visit a museum, go to a ballgame, or check out a new restaurant.   

Residential Habilitation Services

 

Residential services are a lot like PAC services.  They are services for people to get assistance with activities at home (like chores, getting help with showers, or taking medicine) and to go out in the community.  You don’t have to live on your own to get residential services.  A lot of people live with relatives or friends and get these services.  At this time, Sweet Behavior does not offer round the clock residential services.  We only offer hourly services.  

Structured Family Caregiving

 

Structured family caregiving is a service where a person with disabilities lives all the time with a friend and their family in their friend’s home.   The friend and their family help the person with developmental disabilities lead the most independent life possible.  This means that the friend and their family assists the person with any personal care they need (like showers and eating), takes them out in the community to do fun things, helps with any medicines, and helps with doctor’s appointments.